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Old 02-11-2021, 01:44 PM #1
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Shawnathan9's Build Thread

Hello fellow T4R lurkers and regulars.

I decided to post a build thread so I can keep a log of what I have repaired, modified, installed, and the results so others can use it should they like what they see as well as provide any feedback for what I've done to the Runner.

Now I've been a 4runner (3rd gen) owner for years and really kept things stock for the most part. I sold my last 3rd gen two years ago and had been driving a Lexus since then. Just recently, I had already been posting into the "What did you do to your 3rd gen today" and I'll transfer those posts onto this thread in due time.

Recently, I had the itch and jumped on Craigslist and found a local seller offering a 1996 Limited with some minor mods, high mileage, for a reasonable price.

From my initial inspection, I noticed that the UBJ was torn and I believe the previous owner didn't know how to turn a wrench and wanted to sell it instead of paying for costly repairs from a mechanic.

The paint was in immaculate condition as was the interior and trim. The lower valance was taped up but that's easily replaceable. There was a Sony sterero installed that sounded really good. It had a cheap aftermarket roof basket and some Vision 16" RIMS with new Yokohama Geolanders. Front and rear 3" spacer lifts from an unknown company. It ran smooth, shifted fine, but had some loose/rough steering and suspension. The previous owners had over 14yrs of service records. I was convinced that this is a good buy.

I was sold; I purchased it minutes before I had to run to work. With all the paper work in hand, I parked my Lexus on the curb and drove it away:
20201130-172608-Copy

20201130-172555

20201130-172743





Installed/reparied/modified:
  • Removed stock running boards and used some aftermarket step sides that were on my 2nd gen (Will be replaced with rock sliders soon)
  • Depo clear corners and front signal lights
  • Toytec differential drop kit (Previous used a Revo diff drop kit; Do not use these as they were poly bushings that squished within months.)
  • Bilstein 5100 & OME 880/906
  • Replaced front and rear end links w/ Moog K80380 Stabilizer Bar Links for a 2nd gen
  • Replaced OEM UBJs @298k
  • Replaced OEM LBJs @298k
  • Replaced front bumper lower valance
  • NGK spark plug wires/ OEM spark plugs @299k
  • Auto Meter 15411 Gauge w/ MaxTow Double Vision 260 F Transmission Temperature Gauge Kit
  • B&M 70264 Transmission cooler
  • Flushed transmission fluid, differential and transfer case @299k
  • Replaced OEM radiator @299k
  • New OEM radiator cap @299k
  • Flushed coolant and replaced with Toyota Red @299k
  • ScanGauge - SG2 II Ultra Compact 3-in-1
  • Relocated rear window/ ETC switches to dash trim
  • Replaced/installed LED interior lighting & rear license plate
  • BOSS Audio Systems Elite BE7ACP
  • NATIKA Backup camera
  • APEMAN Dash Cam FHD 1080P Car Camera
  • Flowmaster 50 Series Delta Flow
  • Rear differential breather mod
  • Sound dampening mats in rear cargo
  • Fuel filter replaced @299k
  • Satoshi grille mod using 2nd gen Toyota emblem
  • TBU w/ 231m remanufacturered OEM, OEM rotors, OEM brake pads and shims; Stainless steel brake lines
  • SPC UCA @300k
  • Whiteline LCA bushings @300k
  • 1/4" driver side suspension spacer to level things out
  • Window washer relocate mod
  • Trimmed fender flares and the wheel well moldings; Pinch weld mod
  • Installed custom fuse box & breaker
  • Big 3 mod
  • 2014 OEM 17" rims w/ 285/70/r17 BF Goodrich K02
  • Spidertrax WHS007 1.25 spacers; loctite and torqued @90ft lbs
  • Replaced rear lug studs (Thanks America's Tires of Redwood City, CA for NOT hand threading my wheels)
  • Installed rock lights
  • BAMF Rock Sliders
  • Eimkeith PCK




2/11/2021:

20210205-105510

20210205-105520

20210205-105531

20210211-010047



Future plans:
  • Install PKC (Already purchased but looking for a welder)*Installed 2/20/21
  • *Fix the driver side lumber switch that keeps falling out.
  • *Replace the driver side power seat adjustment knob which fell out...
  • *Install a rear window switch in the interior of the lift gate.
  • Bay Area Metal Fabrication rock sliders (Already ordered; waiting for manufacturing/completion) *Installed 2/18/21
  • *Rear plate bumper
  • Install CB radio (Still going through options of where to mount and what model is the most efficient for my use; I have some old ones lying around but they are SO BIG)
  • Roof rack. Honestly trying to stay away from Gobi but it's hard to find any low profile racks that are tasteful. I think T4phorer fabricated his own which turned out GREAT. I don't weld so I'll have to figure out another option.
  • Addicted Offroad front plate bumper w/Stinger
  • JDM rear spoiler with reverse mirror *Already secured one off of eBay.
  • JDM inclinometer
  • PDR to remove two small dings on rear hatch.
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Last edited by shawnathan9; 02-20-2021 at 03:32 PM.
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Old 02-11-2021, 01:44 PM #2
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Added Depo clear corners and front signal lights

Just installed Depo clear corners and front signal lights. The clears look pretty good on Desert dune. Can't wait until I find a parts car on Craigslist and I can grab a replace front bumper valance since mine has gorilla tape on it from the previous owner.

20201207-122114

20201207-122122

20201207-122129
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Old 02-11-2021, 01:47 PM #3
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Installed a Revo differential drop kit

*Update: I removed these and replaced them with a Toytec stainless steel differential drop kit as of January 2021.

I'm a bit disappointed by Revtek as their Amazon listing showed that this was an aluminum spacer but I received a rubber spacer instead. I've complained about this and it's too much of a hassle to go through a replacement at the time but I'll eventually find a place that was aluminum spacers that work.

Differential drop kit:
20201205-091704

Removing the OEM bushing bolts: The kit from Revtek did NOT come with new washers. It stated to use the OEM washers but those are stuck on the original bolt and bolt thread prevent them from being removed. - No way am I going to wreck the OEM bolt since I'll hold onto those for the future.
20201205-101353

I visited a local hardware store and found washers that fit over the new bolt.
20201205-104419

The new washers cover much more width. It turns out to be a problem later as I noticed the washers surface was stripping from the nut due to it being wider than the nut surface. It worked for the moment but shame on you Revtek for asking people to re-use washers that are not meant to be removed from the OEM bolt:
20201205-104454

I had to stack two washers together to match the OEM height.
20201205-104439

Installed one side, loosely bolted before starting on the other side. The differential is being supported by a floor jack.
20201205-105011

The differential drop it is now fully installed.
20201205-112503

The CV axles are now sitting a better angle:
20201205-112456

Just two weeks after the install, I had to remove the spacers while I was replacing the rack and pinion bushings and I noticed how deformed the bushings already are. These are definitely NOT going to hold up like aluminum spacers which Revtek falsely advertised on their Amazon listing. I would not recommend them unless you can be for certain that you'll receive aluminum spacers.
20201210-152439
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Old 02-11-2021, 01:51 PM #4
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Installed Bilstein 5100's and OME 880

After having my Amazon order misdelivered/ stolen, I luckily found a seller and picked up a pair of Bilstein 5100 and OME 880 along with some hardware to manage the install. *I ran into quite a few hardware issues which was caused by using KYB mount plates and my lack of having a good c-clamp to compress the shock bushings to install

On late Tuesday evening, after work, I started to compress my OME 880's and then installed the first coil onto the 5100.

Bilstein 5100
20201208-105800


OME 880
20201208-110330

I started to compress the springs and this was going just fine:
20201208-115835

I totally blanked out as I was watching a movie while doing this and I placed the ring on the 4th perch!!! - I was having a hell of a time compressing the coil; my lack of sleep made my really not focus on the reality of what I was doing. By the time I figured this out, I had already uncompressed my coil to the shock as you can see in this picture:
20201208-235743

As I was taking this photo, I was not considerate of the perch and began to decompress the coil onto the shock:
20201208-235745

I spent about an hour going through the ordeal of re-compressing the spring and then removing it from the shock, and then decompressing the spring once I adjusted the perch settings correctly.

Later on, I ran into an issue installing the Bilstein bushings as there was little to no room to screw on the nut to the top of the shock. I had to McGyver my way through it using clamps and made it work.

Here's a pic of the previous owners work: He installed 3" spacers on the front:
20201209-124154

Out with the old. In with the new:
20201210-145019

*I didn't have any rear coil seats and so I ended up leaving the rear spacers for the time being. *A bit of reverse rake but I'll settle for the time. The rear is really stiff because of this.
20201214-102046
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Old 02-11-2021, 01:54 PM #5
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Replaced UBJ and LBJ

I just purchased this '96 from a guy who had the truck for a few months and looks like he put on a cheap lift kit which compromised the boot of the upper balljoints. The lower balljoints looked to have been there for a while and didn't show much issues but I don't know the history of how this truck was driven and so I decided to replace them.

Dismantling the front end. I noticed that the someone had recently replaced the Tie rods as the rod, boot, castle nut, and retaining wire was pretty new:
20201209-122528

I used a OTC puller set which made the job a breeze. On the upper ball joint, I used this puller and rigged electric tape around it to prevent it from kicking back when the upper ball joint pops out of place. It worked like a charm:
20201209-124151

Here's a picture of the whole knuckle, removed, and the lower ball joint boot looks okay, there was no play, but I've decided to proceed with the replacement for peace of mind:
20201209-124156

This is the condition of the upper ball joint and the main reason why I've removed the knuckle so I have better leverage to press it out on a vice:
20201209-124242

Upon removing the boot and inspecting it, the ball joint appeared in good condition and could've used a reboot kit but I already committed to replacing it so I might save it for a reboot kit project later on:
20201209-125126

I have a Makita impact driver but there wasn't enough torque to move the press; Using a press without an impact driver was one hell of a workout:
20201209-125843

Here we go, I finally popped that sucker out:
20201209-130755

Once I pressed in the upper ball joint, I removed the lower ball joint and then I realized that the flange bolts were not ordered and so I had to place a call to Magnussen Toyota to order them for the next day
20201209-133750

I decided to proceed and use the old bolts only to hold them in firmly until I received the new flange bolts. *From here, I began to work on the driver side knuckle and noticed that upper ball joint was functional, boot was intact, and so I did not remove that knuckle.

Instead, I decided to remove the lower ball joint while the knuckle was still on:
20201210-145016

This morning, I received my flange bolts and started to prep them and began the install:
20201210-145014

*Remember to double check your torque specs. I had inadvertently used the castle nut torque spec for two of the flange bolts before I ended up questing why the hell am I torqueing this so tight and then the second bolt SNAPPED OFF!

I had to disassemble the entire knuckle and bring it to my work table. Luckily, it was the one that had a bolt end sticking up and so I was able to get a pair of vice grips and twist it through the other end. I was just thinking how luck I was that it didn't happen to the ones closest to the brake/dust cover.

I just called Toyota to order two more flange bolts which I'll be picking up tomorrow. For now, I've installed 3 sets on each lower ball joint and 1 set of the old flange bolts (no loctite) until the replacements arrive tomorrow.

*Update, all is well now as I received the 2 flange bolts and torqued to spec.

I love what you do for me...Toyota!!!
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Old 02-11-2021, 01:57 PM #6
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Energy suspension Rack and Pinion bushing kit installed

Amongst other things I did today, I also installed an Energy Suspension Rack and Pinion bushing kit:
Shawnathan9's Build Thread

I had one hell of a time figuring out how to free up slack in order to move the center retaining bolt from it's mount but I learned that there's a steering fluid line bolt that is mounted to the frame right on the drivers side and that gave me enough slack. Then, I was able to move it forward enough to use a press and push out the middle bushing. Get ready for a blurry photo:
20201210-170429

Instead of using the same ball joint press, I've box cutters to trim off the lip of the old bushings, used a screw driver to go between the bushing and washer and give it play and then tap the rest out using socket and a rubber mallet. Afterwards, I cleaned it up to get install the new bushing kit:
20201210-170427

I watched Timmy's video but I decided not to remove my sway bar I was able to make this all work so you can go either way apparently. The passenger side bushing is a breeze to remove:
20201210-170431

20201210-170441

Got them installed and now realize how dirty my rack and pinion look from the previous owners valve cover leak:
20201210-201824

For the price of the bushing kit, it was worth the install.
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Old 02-11-2021, 01:57 PM #7
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Installed 2nd gen Stabilizer links

My original stabilizer end link boots were cracked and the bushings were falling apart and so I decided to upgrade them since I've been working on so much of the front end.

I ordered Moog's 2nd gen end links as I learned that they're about 1" longer than the 3rd gen end links for around the same price.

Here's a side by side:
20201210-202111

Of course, I'm replacing the bushings so I used Energy suspension bushings:
20201210-202113

I don't have all night so I'm going to do the rear end shocks, coils, rear sway bar bushing kit, and end links for tomorrow morning.

For today, I was able to finish my front end suspension, rack and pinion bushing kit, and sway bar bushing kit.
20201210-214224

*I'm just winding down from two days of work on my new 3rd gen but things are coming along nicely.
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Old 02-11-2021, 02:01 PM #8
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Bilstein 5100 and 906 for rear suspension

I decided to go with Bilstein 5100's and OME 960 and will see how they feel for now. *Note, later on during the install, I found out that the because the previous owner installed Daystar spacers that the original coil spring seats were missing. Because of this, I had to decide to either back out of the install or try the install with the existing 2"-3" lift spacers and I went with the later after noticing there was enough slack on all the lines.

I work in the afternoon so I crawled under the truck early this morning and began to install the rear shocks and coils:
20201211-081546

Here's a pic of those spacers that I was intending to remove:
20201211-081608

I removed the sway bar as I'll also be replacing those bushings while I'm in here:
20201211-082749

*I unbolted the brake lines to provide slack for when I remove the shocks and coils.

The passenger side shock came out just fine but the driver side was frozen in place and the shock didn't have an allen to keep it in place. There's no room for a channel lock to use while I wrenched it so I figured I'd bust out my sawzaw to make it easier. Yes, it's a bit barbaric but it gets the job done:
20201211-095414

Installation was a breeze there was plenty of room to wrestle in the coils before installing the new shocks.

I used 2nd gen end links for the rear:
20201211-082926

And, I got my shocks/coils installed before work starts. Woohoo!!
20201212-081501
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Old 02-11-2021, 02:03 PM #9
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Replaced the taped up lower valance

The 4Runner has a lower valance that was taped up from the previous owner and I'm done looking at the nasty looking patch job so I decided to shop online for a cheap replacement and found one on Amazon.

Here's a pic of the lower valance taped up with some sort of gorilla tape and some black paint
20201207-122104

There were two bots, behind the bumper that attach the bumper to the frame. Then, there was one bolt, on each side, right under the very edge of the bumper near the wheel well. Once these are unbolted, you can remove the entire bumper to make it easier to unbolt the lower valance rather than trying to do that while it's attached to the front end:
20201212-100357

Once the bumper comes off, you'll unbolt the valance from the bumper and then use the existing clips on the old valance and place them onto the new valance so you can bolt them back on.

Here's a old valance and the new one:
20201212-100410

With the new valance, the front end looks pretty much like a brand new truck:
20201212-135544
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Old 02-11-2021, 02:04 PM #10
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Painted 3rd and 2nd gen tow hooks

While I wait for transmission temp. gauge that'll I'll work on next, I decided to remove my 2nd gen tow hook as well as my 3rd gen tow hook and paint them red.

You really only need one recovery point but what the hell... each tow hook had it's unique look and I thought that two red hooks were better than one.

Since there's really no need to explain how to unbolt, remove, and install these things, here are pictures of what it looks like on the front end:

20201219-083412

20201218-203957

20201218-204005

20201219-083441

I have a set of d-ring shackles that'll need a mounting bracket to be welded onto the rear tow hitch down the line.
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Bug removal from the dash & removal of the cheap roof rack

When I bought the 4Runner, I noticed that the dash had a dead little critter nicely posted under the fuel gauge and this was one of the things that's been "buggin'" me for a while.
20201215-084804

It just takes a few screws, bolts, some accessories wires to be unplugged and off you go:
20201215-084807

The speedometers protective shield is held in by by clips that you simply press down in order to pop up the plastic shield:
20201215-085126


And there she is...Something that must've been annoying the crap out of the last owner as they obviously didn't take the time to address this thing:
20201215-085131

Finally, the dash doesn't look like a resting place any longer.
20201215-091149

------

The previous owner installed a cheap roof rack, which already showed signs of rusting after one day of rain. I decided to remove it and install it onto my 2nd gen which I am selling today (Kind of sad to see it go since I put good work into making it run as well as it does now)

Requiem for a Dream
20201214-102046
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Old 02-11-2021, 02:07 PM #12
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Installed NGK spark plug wires and replaced OEM spark plugs

My 4Runner came with over 14 years of service records and none suggest the spark plugs were ever changed

Just bought some OEM plugs and NGK wires and went to town. The driver side rear plug did not require any removal of brackets or tubing and I was able to get an extension in there and into the plug without issues.
20201221-103424


Okay, so these are not OEM so it has been changed but never documented. They're NGK's and look like they've been in there for a while:
20201221-104539

The intake tubing had to be removed for the passenger side but this was such an easy install compared to my 2nd gen that was covered with vacuum tubes on the passenger side:
20201221-105855

I hear that these engines eat plugs up pretty fast if it's a single gap. I'm happy to be replacing the NGK's with OEM dual gaps:
20201221-110143

And in less than 30 minutes, we're back in action:
20201221-112149

*Just took it for a spin and it already feels better. *While I was in there, I noticed that the PVC grommet/valve looked old and that's going to be on my list for when I also look into the timing belt and water pump.
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Old 02-11-2021, 02:12 PM #13
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MaxTow Double Vision 260 F Transmission temp gauge w/ Auto Meter a-pilar mount

Lately, I've been on a Timmy YT binge and have been going through a ton of useful content. I pulled the trigger and, last week, I decided to order a transmission temp. gauge and a transmission cooler for preventative maintenance.

The first thing I did was attempt to JB weld the temp gauge housing to the a-pillar plastic.

20201227-084950

I wasn't happy with the extra material that hung past the a-pillar so I decided to dremel/file away the excess.

Before:
20201227-082054

After:
20201227-202238
20201227-082038

Dremeled a pathway for the wiring that will lead behind the a-pilar:
20201227-202230

Following Timmy's guide, I assembled a brass tee and a brass bushing to fit the transmission temperature sensor:
20201229-092740

*I decided to secure the sensor wiring with a loom and electric tape to keep it away from debris.

Continued with installing two brass barbs to complete the assembly:
20201229-093226
20201229-093658

I decided to wrap some electric tape on a pair of vice' and clamped both sides of the transmission tubing to prevent excess leakage/mess:
20201229-094225

I made quick work of the fitting and decided to lead the sensor from the bottom to prevent any trapped air:
20201229-100213

After an initial test to determine the length of wire needed, I cut the plug side and soldered a thicker gauge wire to the plugs and later covered it with a loom:
20201227-205017

I fastened the cabling with a zip ties to prevent any possibility of it touching the belts:
20201231-150719

I also used a universal firewall boot and lead the loomed assembly through it first, measuring how much excess cabling I'll have lead into through the firewall, pushed it through with the loom, and it was water tight due to the loom being in place with the firewall boot.

Now, the I had to go through the trouble of removing the center console, radio, and then some soldering into the right connections.
20201227-110518

Along the way, I found remnants of the previous owners belongings under the console:
20201227-090307

Since I was down there, I installed a Magnefine magnetic line transmission filter which was super easy to do:
20201229-103308

I performed a quick fitting and was happy with the placement of the gauge and that the wiring worked out. Then, the JW weld snapped off and I realized I didn't use a plastic glue. I decided to use some small screws and decided to call it a day:
20201229-110812

The matching paint came the next day so know it doesn't look so tacky:
20201230-133000

*continued...
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Old 02-11-2021, 02:13 PM #14
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*Removed the radiator grill, removed the car horns to prep for the trans. cooler install:
20201231-141546

I decided that the current radiator is still good, for now, and so I opt'd out of replacing it today (though I had a OEM radiator on stand-by). Instead, I removed the 4 bolts and was able to clear enough room to install the trans. cooler. - I had to pull the radiator back, carefully without any damage to the fins, and fasten it with a bungee cord to keep it back far enough so I can reach down to install the cooler:
20201231-141532
20201231-141537
20201231-141542
20201231-141529

Found the ideal set up, that everyone seems to use, and pushed the provided zip ties through the ac:
20201231-142718

As you can see here, you can get away with the install without removing the radiator:
20201231-142727
20201231-142941

I decided to connect the tubing from the radiator end and then guide it to the cooler to have a good length fit. Installed the inlet hose on the bottom and the outlet on the top of the cooler:
20201231-150756
20201231-150719
20201231-144953
20201231-144958

I already noticed a difference when I was driving around today and found that my temps were 30-40 degrees cooler

*Finally, a new pic without the cringe Amazon roof rack that the previous owner installed.
20201230-132842
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Old 02-11-2021, 02:21 PM #15
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Installed a back up camera the right way.

After much debate about how I should go about an install for a back up camera, I finally decided to try a camera that looks as OEM as possible and route it through the rear hatch and through the rubber tubes leading into the headliner and then routed through the B pillar, through the lower moldings and then into the stereo.

To get it all started, I selected an aftermarket back up camera that looks as OEM as possible and a affordable Android 7" touch screen to get the job done since the price allowed for it to be upgraded later should I agree with the camera set up I run through the rig.

Camera: NATIKA Backup/Front View Camera
Natika-camera

A cheap Android 7" double din on Amazon (This is cheap enough to pass on to my nephew should I have an urge to upgrade due to any functionality issues): Amazon.com: ANKEWAY 7 Inch Android 9.1 Car Stereo with HiFi+WiFi+Bluetooth+GPS+RDS+FM, 2021 New Double Din Car Radio 1080P HD Touch Screen Multimedia Player+Mirror Link(Android/iOS)+Rearview Camera+Dual USB: GPS & Navigation

*The first thing you'll want to do is to remove the back door trim so you can begin your journey to access the rear door innards where you'll later guide your back up camera wiring. It helps to have a service manual to understand what parts should be removed.
20210105-211202

Note: The factory manual will tell you to take apart everything but you can actually do this with minimal disassembly; You don't have to remove the rear window, regulator, or hatch handles at all.

The first thing you'll want to do is to remove the plastic cover from the hatch hoop that's located on the back door trim:
20210105-210935

Next, you'll want to use a trim remover tool, or a small screw driver with tape, to avoid any damage to your parts, and pry up and remove the back door trim which is only held in place with 10 plastic tension clips which can be referenced in the previous picture of the service manual shown above. - Once the 10 clips are unfastened, you'll want to use some pressure and push the back trim as if you were pushing it upward in the direction the window would close up. It's only held in by tension so it will not break anything:
20210105-205909

Once removed, you'll have access to a black plate where you'll want to disconnect the electrical connections and also associated mounts from their respective points. *If you don't remove them, they'll keep that black plate dangling onto the back door because you'll want to remove that plate in the next step. So, take your time to unplug and unmount those connections and wires:
20210105-212216

There will be several bronze colored screws that hold down the black plate and then you'll want to gentle pry between the plastic fasteners and the black plate will pop off:
20210105-212415

Once removed, you'll have access to the inside of the back door. This was necessary for the application as I want to mount the camera onto the back door trim next to the license plate lights. I chose the right side as there appears to be an opening behind it whilst the left side was sealed closed:
20210105-221702

This provided enough space to drill a hole into the back door in a place where it will not be noticeable should I choose to remove this one day:
20210105-223542

After choosing the position of where I want to mount the camera, I selected a few drill bits that match the size of my camera's mounting bolt and the wiring that needs to be led into the rear door:
20210105-224713

I checked the hole which I drilled through the back door and found that it was positioned in area that will not impede on the glass windows path when it lowers down. Now, I began to install the camera and hope that it fits as intended:
20210105-225341

The area to work was too small for a wrench so I used a pair of long nosed pliers to fasten the nut onto the back up camera bolt and then finished leading the wires through the back door (tape some electric tape on the plastic trip to avoid any rubbing with your pliers:
20210105-230001

From here, I used an abundant amount of gasket sealer and covered the area where I drilled so as to prevent any expose to weather conditions and to act as a buffer against any rubbing that the wire could have elsewise encountered:
20210105-231402

Now that I was satisfied of how the camera sits in an OEM style position and it has the OEM look, I gave it a final torque to tighten it and reinstalled the right driver license light back into to place and moved to snaking the camera wire in the door latch.

You'll find there's just enough hand space to guide that wire within the right side of the door assembly and there will be door latch wire that you can use to zip tie your camera wire against. (If you pay attention, you'll realize that door latch wire must not be in the way of the window so you can simply use that as a guide to how you'll want to guide your camera wire through the back of your door:
20210105-232222

Once you zip tied your cable toward the right of the door, set the wire aside and look up and you'll see the rubber boot that is covering the wires that lead into your chassis.

You'll want to lead your camera wiring through this boot so you don not cause any wear and exposure of elements to the wiring. To get started, you'll need access to the chassis end of the boot.

To do this, you'll need to remove the bottom plastic retainer panel of your trunk as that holds the side trim in place and you won't be able to pop off your side trim until you remove this piece:
20210105-205220

Next, remove your rear door light the screws within will keep the upper plastic panel in place:
20210105-205853

Once removed, you can pop off your upper panel using that trim remover tool:
20210105-205858

You should now have access to your wiring within the chassis side of the rubber boot:
20210105-211003

*If your back up camera wiring is like this one, it comes in two parts; One part is directly connected to the camera and has an end that has a connector. This is the part you've been leading through the back door. The other wire the kit comes with is an extension that leads to your stereo and this is also has a leads that'll connect to your reverse light so you can active the camera.

Next, I moved on to lead the wire extension through the rubber boot that connects the chassis to the rear door.

*Caution: Removing this may cause you to break the plastic retaining fastener and you may have to use gasket sealer to secure the existing boot as you'll have a hell of a time trying to remount the OEM boot back into place.

Next, I unplugged both ends of the rubber boot and also a middle plastic retainer clip and then lead the wiring through the chassis side, through the boot, and out to the rear door side:
20210105-232502

I found a hollow metal tube lying around the work area. I lead the entire wire through the tube until the connecter tip, the one that is supposed to connect to the previous wire that we were leading through the back door, was at the end of the hollow tube. I used some silicone to lube up the tube and then inserted it through the boot and pushed it through until it, and the wire connector, both pushed through the end that leads to the back door:

Hollow tube:
20210105-234435

Wires successfully snaked through the rubber boot:
20210105-234447

..continued
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